[REVIEW] Wanderer by Sarah Léon, translated by John Cullen @OtherPress

Other Press is one of those publishers you love because of their ability to choose and publish brilliant new voices in fiction as well as non-fiction. Wanderer by Sarah Leon was such an interesting and thought-provoking read but not a perfect one.

Wanderer by Sarah Leon is set in France, in a small territory near Bourbonnais Mountains, where we are introduced to Hermin Peyre, a composer who has decided to isolate himself in order to spend his time composing a piece dedicated to Schubert. One wintry night Leonard Wieck, Lenny, shows up on his doorstep after ten years of not having any contact with him. This event will put years of unspoken words and frustrations out in the open for both Hermin and Lenny. They must revisit their past together in order to better understand what happened between them and what kind of damage has been done. What happened between the two? What lies behind their silence?

‘’The fabric of his life had slowly worn itself out during those years of virtual solitude.’’

Leon having written this book at the age of twenty-one amazes me. Not only because of the fact that she was twenty-one but because of the way she crafts sentences and how she perceives certain things. The way music and certain musical pieces were intertwined within the story was beautiful and Leon combining music with winter made me feel like I was right there with Hermin and Lenny. Both characters are very flawed and interesting. Our story is told from Hermin’s POV which revisits the past and the present in each chapter so we get almost a full picture of what happened. Since the book is told from Hermin’s POV and since Lenny is his guest, Leon makes us a part of Hermin because we experience everything from his perspective – it feels as though we have welcomed a long lost friend into our home and are experiencing all of the consequences that this brings. What I found most enjoyable was the language in the story and the way Leon creates them which are all wonderfully translated from French by John Cullen. The translator did a fantastic job! The story is something I found to be weak – although the ‘ghosts of the past’ came to haunt both characters I felt as though the story could’ve been thought-out better. I get the decision behind bringing Lenny back after ten years of silence but I felt dissatisfied in a way because of the way the story went. I hope this makes sense to people who have read it but the story felt predictable to me. Wanderer being Leon’s debut novel shows to me that she has a lot of skill and I’m excited to see what she comes up with in the future. I feel like what Leon fell short on [for me] she made up by the way she wrote this novel.

‘’I’d looked at him helplessly. I’d never had any gift for consoling people – I could listen to them talk about their trouble, sure, but then how to find the right words? And this particular case seemd to be precisely the sort about which there was nothing to say; no phrases would have the power to cushion the blow that had just struck him. But in spite of all that, I was required to say something…’’

Wanderer explores the psychological effects of what long periods of silence do to a friendship and what damage they may cause.

If you’re someone who likes their reads to be more on the psychological side then I definitely recommend this book.

I would like to thank the publisher Other Press (NY) for providing me with a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed here are my own and weren’t influenced by the fact that I got this book from the publisher.

My rating: 

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Gérard Cambon-Éditions Héloïse

Sarah Léon was born in 1995 and studied literature and musicology at the École normale supérieure in Paris. She won the 2012 Prix Clara for her novella, Mon Alban.

Find her on: Publisher’s website and Goodreads.

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[BLOG TOUR: BOOK REVIEW] The Chestnut Man by Søren Sveistrup @MichaelJBooks #TheChestnutMan

I was very excited when I opened Twitter and saw a message about joining the blog tour for The Chestnut Man. Having loved The Killing TV series I couldn’t wait to dive into this one and I’m happy to say that I wasn’t disappointed!

The Chestnut Man follows Naia Thulin and Mark Hess in their quest to solve the mystery and murder of Laura Kjaer, whose murder appears to be routinely executed but upon looking at the details both Thulin and Hess begin to see that something isn’t right. We are also introduced to Rosa Hartung who is a Minister for Social Affairs and who carries a horrible loss behind her. Rosa’s loss is the murder of her daughter whose killer has been caught but his testimony doesn’t make sense. Laura Kjaer’s murder contains a piece of evidence which is linked with Rosa‘s horrible loss – this discovery sets both Thulin and Hess in search of the truth behind the Chestnut Man.

Reading the first few chapters I felt shivers because of how dark and gruesome they were! What an opening! From the beginning we are introduced to Naia Thulin, a detective in the Homicide’s Murder Squad who feels like this job isn’t thrilling her and challenging her anymore so she plans on moving to the Cyber Crime Unit. Mark Hess has been kicked out of Europol for causing many issues and has made his way to Homicide’s Murder Squad. We can see that Hess doesn’t want to be there at all and already has plans to move quickly. Hess and Thulin have been partnered together in solving the case of Laura Kjaer and although not standing each other they have to do their best in solving it. Sveistrup has an amazing ability at writing gruesome scenes because I felt unsettled whenever I stumbled upon them. Naia Thulin’s character has to be my favourite because of how interesting she is and how her psyche worked. In the beginning Mark Hess wasn’t someone I liked but throughout the book we saw his flaws and that gave him depth and a somewhat understanding of why he is who he is. There are many voices in this book and at times I did feel lost because it didn’t keep my attention. Compared to the first part of the book the last part kept me much more entertained and although I found it a bit weak at times I felt that the ending made up for that. Sveistrup is someone who can write and I got reminded why I love these sort of books.

The Chestnut Man is a fantastic debut I highly recommend you pick up if you like dark and interesting thrillers.

I would like to thank the publisher Penguin Random House UK (Michael Joseph) for inviting me on the blog tour and providing me with a review copy of this book in exchange for a review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

Make sure to check out other book bloggers’ reviews on this tour!

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Søren Sveistrup is an internationally acclaimed scriptwriter of the Danish television phenomenon The Killing which won various international awards and sold in more than a hundred countries. More recently, Sveistrup wrote the screenplay for Jo Nesbø’s The Snowman. Sveistrup obtained a Master in Literature and in History from the University of Copenhagen and studied at the Danish Film School. He has won countless prizes, including an Emmy for Nikolaj and Julie and a BAFTA for The Killing.

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[BLOG TOUR: BOOK REVIEW] Who I Am by Sarah Simpson @sarahrsimpson @aria_fiction

I was invited by the author to join the blog tour for Who I Am and after reading the synopsis of it I had to say yes because – twisted friendship, twisted characters YES.

“You never know do you, people’s backgrounds, how much it impacts on them? The choices they make because of it.”

Who I Am follows two characters Andi and Camilla who upon meeting at University become best friends and quickly share their secrets and pour their souls to each other. The story is set to two different timelines 2000’s and 2017. In 2017 we see Andi as an adult with children, living almost an idyllic life but not everything is what it seems. She is haunted by what happened one night at the beach which changed everything and soon she becomes stalked by someone who knows what happened and is blaming her for it. Who is out there to get her?

I have to compliment the design of this book because it’s so good. Well done, book designer! From the first two/three chapters you can already sense that this story won’t be the usual ‘friendship’ one because it contains dark elements that make you all tingly inside because you know it will be a fun ride. The author’s background as a psychologist shows throughout the book and I love how in-depth her characters were and how you could analyse their actions. I also learned what Korsakoff’s syndrome is which I haven’t heard of before. Towards the last 150 pages of the story Simpson introduces a few more characters which I found to be very interesting and loved reading their POV. This book is very dark and is unlike other toxic friendship stories as I’ve mentioned before. It contains some trigger warnings (e.g. alcohol abuse) which may not suit every reader. I especially enjoyed how unreliable Andi’s characters was because I began second guessing her intentions and her role in that awful night at the beach. What I found lacking in Who I Am is that sometimes I felt the story going somewhere and losing my interest – but that wasn’t a huge part because I did enjoy the story a lot. I found Eve’s character to offer more info on Andi [which I appreciated] but she didn’t feel very necessary to the story for me. From my experience with Who I Am I can say that Simpson knows how to write dark characters and twisted stories. I was captivated throughout the book and although I found some small parts to lose my interest I absolutely enjoyed spending my time with Who I Am.

If you enjoy reading dark and twisted stories with unreliable narrators then you’re in for a treat with Who I Am.

I would like to thank the author Sarah Simpson as well as the publisher Aria Fiction for inviting me to join the blog tour and providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written in this review are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

Add ‘Who I Am‘ to your TBR:  

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*I am in no way compensated by this site. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Sarah Simpson has a business degree and a first class honours degree in psychology with appropriate post-graduate qualifications. Her background, working privately within mental health for many years; within the collaborative family law arena and with additional experience within the family court system has gifted her an invaluable understanding of life and people. Thus, Her Greatest Mistake is a cocktail of professional and personal experiences stirred vigorously by the imagination.

She is relatively late to the writing scene, despite a love of books and writing from when she was very young, it wasn’t until 2016 that she sat down to put pen to paper. Her Greatest Mistake was then some twelve months in creation, followed by some vigorous re-writing. In June 2017, she signed with her current agent Broo Doherty and shortly after was offered a three book publishing contract with Aria, Head of Zeus…

Find her on: Website, Twitter and Goodreads.

[REVIEW] A Different Drummer by William Melvin Kelley @QuercusBooks

I first heard of this book from Instagram and Twitter but mostly from Ana [who works at Quercus] who loved this book a lot. What I found amazing is that Quercus gave a copy of A Different Drummer to their employees and gave them a morning off to read it which shows how they feel about it. I am so glad and grateful I had this book sent to me.

‘I mean it seems horrible that the most you can do for people you love is leave them alone.’

In a fictional town called Sutton, one black man, Tucker Caliban, throws salt on his fields, shoots his horse and cow, sets fire to his house and departs Sutton. Along with him other black towns folk follow. From this point the story is told from white towns folk perspective – whether it be male, female, adult or child.

‘It was that gradually, going back as far as I can remember, they kept saying less and less to each other until the time came – this is the time I’m talking about – that they didn’t say anything at all to each other . . . except maybe at night when I guess married people feel most alone, when they realize how little they have in common, and how much they’ve lost.’

I don’t tend to read these stories often but when I do I really appreciate them because I love learning something new from them. When I say ‘these stories’ I mean stories tackling race issues – where I live there are not many black people and it’s predominantly white but I have always been raised to view everyone as equal which I’m grateful for. I found A Different Drummer to be such an interesting read that I teared up a few times while reading it. The ending of the book left me broken because of how people can be cruel and selfish.  I love the idea of telling the story from white people’s POV because it is very fascinating. I have actually raced through at least 200+ pages in a day and finished the book because I found it to be so compelling and the story-telling to be excellent. William Melvin Kelley shows great writing skills and I would absolutely love to read the rest of his works. The story felt and is relevant today and I think more people should get to know this author better by reading A Different Drummer. This is the kind of book that makes you dissect it after you’ve finished it. I honestly don’t know what else to say about this book except that I found it to be so well written considering that the author was 23 at the time.

Read it.

I would like to thank the publisher Quercus Books (Riverrun) and Ana for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

William Melvin Kelley was a prominent African-American novelist and short-story writer. He was educated at the Fieldston School in New York and later attended Harvard University (class of 1960), where he won the Dana Reed Prize for creative writing. William Melvin Kelley has been a writer in residence at the State University of New York at Geneseo and has taught at the New School for Social Research. He currently teaches at Sarah Lawrence College. In 2008, he won the Anisfield-Wolf Lifetime Achievement Award.

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[REVIEW] The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton @BloomsburyRaven

I have seen this book all over social media and when I say all over I truly mean all over – Twitter, Instagram, Goodreads, Youtube and book blogs. What first attracted me to it was the synopsis because it sounds so good and unique. I’m sure that the synopsis of Seven Deaths will intrigue every lover of mystery books (if one could classify it as such).

The story revolves around one woman called Evelyn Hardcastle who upon attending a party thrown for her by her parents gets murdered. This happens every night and the quest of saving Evelyn falls upon one man called Aiden Bishop. Aiden re-lives this whole day through the eyes of different guests and what he’s tasked with is solving the mystery around Evelyn’s death. But solving her death is very tricky and Aiden must give his all in order to find out the truth behind her death[s].

I have kept this synopsis short and sweet because it’s all you need before going in. The first question that pops into my mind is – is Seven Deaths worth the hype it got and still gets? I would say that it is because it offers something unique and something I haven’t read before. The story is complex and interesting and very rich in terms of characters and happenings. Because I’ve been busy with tests/exams I’ve been reading it for a longer period than usual but I have to note that I’ve read around 400 pages in two days which says something about the book as well as Turton’s writing. I found the characters as well as different timelines to be confusing at times because a lot of stuff happens in it. I enjoyed the mystery around Evelyn as well as Aiden’s attempts at trying to figure out what exactly happens every night. The last one-hundred pages were so good and fast-paced that I couldn’t look away so even though I was in class at one point I just kept reading instead of paying attention [sorry professor]. I love the complexity of the story Turton has created because even when I was trying to guess what Aiden was missing, Turton managed to add a new layer to the story and point to a different direction. I found the conclusion to the book to be very interesting and wanted at least twenty more pages just so I could see what happened! What bothered me the most and what I mentioned at the beginning are the characters and switching timelines but other than that I found the book to be such a strong mystery.

If you’re someone who gets sort of distanced when it comes to hyped-up books I can assure you that with this one you won’t be disappointed because it will thrill you, mislead you and entertain you. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle stands as a strong mystery book and one of the most interesting ones I’ve read in a while.

I would like to thank the publisher Bloomsbury UK (Raven Books) for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and weren’t influenced by the fact that I got this book free from the publisher.

My rating: 

Add ‘The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle‘ to your TBR:  

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Stuart Turton lives in London with his amazing wife and daughter. He drinks lots of tea.

What else?

​When he left university he went travelling for three months and stayed away for five years. Every time his parents asked when he’d be back he told them next week, and meant it.

Stuart is not to be trusted. In the nicest possible way.

He’s got a degree in English and Philosophy, which makes him excellent at arguing and terrible at choosing degrees.

Having trained for no particular career, he has dabbled in most of them. He stocked shelves in a Darwin bookshop, taught English in Shanghai, worked for a technology magazine in London, wrote travel articles in Dubai, and now he’s a freelance journalist. None of this was planned, he just kept getting lost on his way to other places…

Find him on: Website, Goodreads and Twitter.

[REVIEW] The Parting Gift by Evan Fallenberg @OtherPress

When it comes to books that feature LGBTQ+ themes I’m all ears so getting a chance to read The Parting Gift was very exciting for me. Oh boy, was this book brilliant! I have to mention the hardcover copy and how brilliantly it was designed. Wow, just wow. Well done Other Press!

The story centers around an unknown narrator who upon coming back from Israel crashes in his friend’s apartment and the book is written in a form of one long letter addressed to that friend, Adam. Since our narrator has found a new location to live in he decides to leave an explanation as to why he came to crash at his place for four months. Our narrator tells Adam the story of Uzi, a spice merchant he met during his trip as well as meeting Uzi’s family, of love, of obsession, of dedication and more.

I think that my summary is enough to read before going in and that’s why I kept it short. I’ve no idea what’s happening lately because I’ve been reading fantastic books – let’s not jinx this because I want to read more fantastic books in the future. I read The Parting Gift in a day because it was so fast-paced and so good that I couldn’t look away. I just made breaks to make more cups of tea. Fallenberg writes so masterfully and keeps your attention at all times and the way he crafted this tale was fantastic. I love how he created the characters in it especially our unknown narrator who is so fascinating and whose psyche I loved examining throughout the book. Unknown narrator is so interesting and his actions made me question many things about him. The story is developed very well and there’s no dull moment in it. If I was to compare this book to other ones I would definitely say that it reminded me of Gone Girl in a way – now I know everything is compared to Gone Girl nowadays but this book really left me with that impression. When I reached the end of The Parting Gift I found myself wanting more and exactly this ability the author has to make the reader want more is what amazes me. I honestly don’t know what else to say because I fear I’ll ruin your experience with this book so just do yourself a favour and pick this book up.

The Parting Gift is a fascinating tale of love, paranoia, jealousy and deviance set in a in a small town north of Tel Aviv.

I would like to thank the publisher Other Press for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

Add ‘The Parting Gift‘ to your TBR:  

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Fallenberg is a graduate of Georgetown University and the MFA program in creative writing at Vermont College of Fine Arts and has lived in Israel since 1985. He is coordinator of fiction for the Shaindy Rudoff Graduate Program in Creative Writing at Bar-Ilan University; coordinator of literary translation in the Department of English Literature at Bar-Ilan University; and an instructor in the low-residency MFA program in creative writing at City University of Hong Kong. The recipient of fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Vermont Studio Center and the National Endowment for the Arts, Fallenberg serves as an advisor to several literary prizes, including the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. He is the father of two sons.

Find him on: Goodreads

[REVIEW] Little by Edward Carey @BelgraviaB

Until I find a hi res cover of the book this will be up.

Seeing Little all over Twitter made me very curious about it plus the art inside. I was lucky enough to get a copy of it to review and I absolutely adored it.

Little follows Anne Marie Grosholtz later to be known as Madame Tussaud. We follow Marie from the minute she’s born and then into her old age. Marie’s life is full of adventure, pain, loss, happiness, excitement. At a young age [and after the death of her parents] she becomes apprenticed to a wax sculptor called Doctor Curtius who sees potential in her because she’s not the one to shy away from looking at the ugly side of life. By chance they move their residence to an odd house where she meets a widow and her strange son who become entangled into the wax world and leave a mark upon Marie. Doctor Curtius’ wax figures attract attention and one day Marie meets a princess who hires her to be her ‘art teacher’ and teach her everything she knows. She forms a bond with the princess but things slowly change because something’s beginning in Paris – something that will change Marie’s life forever.

Congratulations, you have survived my terrible summary of Little! Moving on – what can one say about this book except that it’s magical, fantastic and brilliantly written? There’s a quote on the back of Little that stayed with me throughout the book and that’s one author saying that the book is written ‘with surgical precision’ which I have to completely agree with. I loved Carey’s writing style and how he managed to bring Marie, Doctor Curtius, Edmond and other characters to life. The book contains drawings made by the author which compliment the story so well. I am in awe of Carey’s talent in both fields – writing and drawing. The story kept me entertained, made me feel sad towards the end and happy because I loved following Marie and her adventures. I can honestly say that Little is a book I won’t forget and that it will stay with me for a while.

If you enjoy reading historical fiction and stories that stay with you long after you finish them – Little is definitely the book for you.

I would like to thank the publisher Belgravia Books (Aardvark Bureau) for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

Add ‘Little by Edward Carey‘ to your TBR:  

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Edward Carey is a writer and illustrator who was born in North Walsham, Norfolk, England, during an April snowstorm. Like his father and his grandfather, both officers in the Royal Navy, he attended Pangbourne Nautical College, where the closest he came to following his family calling was playing Captain Andy in the school’s production of Showboat. Afterwards he joined the National Youth Theatre and studied drama at Hull University.

He has written plays for the National Theatre of Romania and the Vilnius Small State Theatre, Lithuania. In England his plays and adaptations have been performed at the Young Vic Studio, the Battersea Arts Centre, and the Royal Opera House Studio. He has collaborated on a shadow puppet production of Macbeth in Malaysia, and with the Faulty Optic Theatre of Puppets.

He is also the author of the novels Observatory Mansions and Alva and Irva: the Twins Who Saved a City, which have been translated into thirteen different languages, and both of which he illustrated…

Find him on: Website, Twitter and Goodreads.

[REVIEW] The Hurtle of Hell by Simon Edge @EyeAndLightning

This is the second title from Eye/Lightning Books I’ve read and I can honestly say that both have been such great and enjoyable reads. I especially enjoyed reading The Hurtle of Hell which I found to be very funny as well as very entertaining.

The Hurtle of Hell is about Stefano (Steven) Cartwright who has an NDA (near death experience) while swimming at the beach. What he sees in a few brief moments while being under is an white tube and an eye – which he believes is the eye of God. Stefano is an atheist who doesn’t particularly care about religion but after this event his perception of religion and God changes. We have one more POV in the book and it’s from God who sees Stefano through his tube and starts wondering how and why that happened. From then on the story continues with Stefano and we see how this experience changed him as well as what God does with this new information.

I tried to provide a synopsis that doesn’t reveal too much so I think that the information you read here is enough before starting The Hurtle of Hell. The book itself is written with style that just flows and makes you read on. The book discusses many themes such as religion and how its perceived, homosexuality as well as the debate between heaven and hell SO keep this in mind if you’re a very religious person because the author does play with the role of God. Being an agnostic myself, I found this book to be very interesting and loved that Edge included God’s perspective in it because it provided something fresh. In this universe God is a somewhat distant being who doesn’t have much knowledge as well as contact with the species in it which is very interesting. As I’ve mentioned before The Hurtle of Hell is very funny and the comedy in it shines through because of the characters.

If you’re someone who loves reading funny books from time to time then look no further because The Hurtle of Hell is the one for you.

I would like to thank the publisher Eye/Lightning Books for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

Add ‘The Hurtle of Hell‘ to your TBR:  

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Simon Edge is the author of The Hopkins Conundrum, a tragic comedy about Gerard Manley Hopkins and five shipwrecked nuns, (Lightning Books, 2017) and The Hurtle of Hell, an atheist comedy featuring God and a confused young man from Hackney, (Lightning Books, 2018).
Find him on: Website, Twitter and Goodreads.

[BLOG TOUR: REVIEW] The Syndicate by Guy Bolton @gpbolton #TheSyndicate @PtBlankBks

Today is my stop at the blog tour for The Syndicate by Guy Bolton.

Before ever getting the chance to read The Syndicate I’ve seen it mostly on Twitter and found the cover to be intriguing as well as the 1940’s noir feel to it something I knew I’d enjoy – and I did enjoy reading it.

The Syndicate by Guy Bolton begins with a bang – a mobster called Bugsy Siegel comes home and has drinks with two friends but after a while something shocking happens, he gets shot in his home with two witnesses who know nothing about why he was killed and who would’ve killed him. Enter Jonathan Craine a now retired fixer who dealt with many scandals and deals featuring Hollywood movie stars. Craine now lives on a farm with his son and has distanced himself from his previous life but the murder of Siegel brings trouble his way. Craine and his son get visited by a few people who want Craine to investigate the murder but as Craine politely refuses his son becomes imprisoned by them. In order to save his son he has to cooperate with them and find out who killed Bugsy Siegel. As Craine begins the search for Siegel’s killer he enters a dangerous world where everyone could be a suspect and in order to find out who killed the infamous mobster and save his son he will have to do what he does best with limited time and limited access to news reports, crime documents etc. Will Craine be able to save his son and find Siegel’s murderer?

I found The Syndicate to be such a fantastic, fast-paced and thrilling book because right from the start you get action and it intrigues you and makes you want to read on and find out who killed Siegel and will Craine be able to find it out. Bolton writes superbly and I loved that he featured Old Hollywood stars like Ava Gardner, Judy Garland and more in the background of the book. You won’t find a dull moment in the book because the mystery keeps you pulled in. I loved how flawed Craine was and how we saw his vulnerabilites but more than that I loved that Bolton featured a woman as part of the story, Tilda Conroy as well as another woman of colour. Bolton mentions issues which were big at that time like colourism where only white people were allowed into bars and restaurants and sexism. I appreciated this and it gave points to Bolton in my mind. Whenever I read this book I read huge chunks of it which only happens when a book manages to keep you entertained. I liked the ending of the book and I when I finished the book I was left with a melancholic feeling because I had such a great time reading it.

If you’re someone who enjoys reading about mysterious deaths, who likes noir and getting lost in thrilling books, The Syndicate is the one for you.

I would like to thank the publisher Point Blank Books for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

The Syndicate was released by Oneworld Publications (Point Blank Books) on 4th October 2018. Hardback £16.99

My rating: 

Add ‘The Syndicate‘ to your TBR:  

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Guy Bolton is an author and screenwriter based in London. After graduating with a 1st in Film & Literature from Warwick University, he worked in music video, publishing and film before joining the BBC. After ten years working in television drama, Guy now writes full time.

ITV Studios, Tiger Aspect and Hat Trick are among the production companies who have optioned Guy’s work. He has also written feature film scripts for Bedlam Productions and Signature Pictures. He currently has a feature film in development with the BFI.

Guy’s first novel The Pictures, a detective thriller set in 1930s Hollywood, was shortlisted for a CWA Dagger award. It was listed as one of the top 10 crime books of 2017 by the Telegraph, The Times and the Mail on Sunday.

Guy’s second novel, The Syndicate, will be released in October 2018.

Find him on: Website, Goodreads and Twitter.

[REVIEW+GIVEAWAY] True or Poo?: The Definitive Field Guide to Filthy Animal Facts and Falsehoods by N. Caruso and D. Rabaiotti @QuercusBooks

True or Poo?: The Definitive Field Guide to Filthy Animal Facts and Falsehoods by Nick Caruso and Dani Rabaiotti is a short and fun non-fiction book about animals and certain aspects of their lives (e.g. how they live, what they eat etc.). Although it’s short I can say with absolute certainty that it will entertain the life out of you! It has so many interesting facts about many many animals! True or Poo? can be read in just a few hours and will keep you entertained with the amazing drawings of different animals. Here’s an example of a chapter in the book (I also found this funny and interesting so I wanted to share it):

WHITE SAND IS MADE OF FISH POO: TRUE OR POO? TRUE

‘’…Bumphead parrotfish bite off bits of coral with their hard beaks, which continuously grow throughout their lifetimes, before chewing it into dust with specialized pharyngeal teeth, digesting the algae and leaving behind the coral’s powdered, rocky remains. This ground-up coral is then pooed out as a fine sand, before being washed ashore to form the stunning beaches for which the Maldives are famous. Each parrotfish can produce 90 kg of sand each year, and as a result 85% of sand in the region has passed through a parrotfish at some point. So if you are ever lucky enough to visit the Maldives, you can relax on the beach knowing it all would not have been possible without one special parrotfishes’ sandy stools.’’ *

*this is a part of the chapter in the book.

Before you begin the book you will be greeted with an introduction by the authors and after the introduction you will have a brief summary of what to expect in the first segment of the book. The book has six segments: 1. Courtship, Mating and Parenting, 2. Animal Eating Habits, 3. Digestion and Excretion and more. Before you venture into the world of disgusting facts you will have a brief summary before each segment as well as what to expect in it (I realise I repeated myself in this sentence). I really enjoyed spending a few hours getting lost in this book and learning new facts and being disgusted by them – I still am by the one with mites! I also learned that some animals can change genders (from male to female and vice versa)! How cool is that! That there’s a friendship between a frog and a spider and many more!

If you’re a person who loves discovering and learning new things you will love this book! Also if you get easily disgusted then read a chapter a day!

I would like to thank the publisher Quercus Books UK for providing me with a digital copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

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Dani Rabaiotti is a PhD candidate and zoologist who studies African wild dogs and climate change at London Zoo.

Find her on: Website, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Nick Caruso is currently a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Tech. His research focuses on ecology and conservation of Appalachian salamanders and of herpetofauna in the Florida panhandle.

Find him on: Website, Twitter and Goodreads.