[BOOK REVIEW] The Rapture by Claire McGlasson #TheRapture @FaberBooks

Having read both Clare and Amanda’s amazing reviews of The Rapture by Claire McGlasson I knew that this book would be for me! Luckily, I got my copy from the wonderful publisher Faber&Faber and I have to say that I loved reading it!

The Rapture is a book revolving around The Panacea Society, an English cult which existed back in the 1920s, and one particular person called Dilys who’s a member of the cult. The cult was founded by Mabel Barltrop, better known as Octavia, who was self-proclaimed as the Daughter of God. The cult consists of mostly single ladies and Dilys is the youngest member in her mid twenties. One day she meets a woman named Grace and invites her to visit The Panacea Society and find out more about it. Grace soon becomes a new recruit and begins living in the Society as help. The friendship between Dilys and Grace becomes stronger and closer as time passes and while that is going on the Society begins to change. Each person has something to hide. Dilys, once a full-blown believer, now becomes suspicious as to how the Society actually works.

I read The Rapture in two sittings – it was captivating, interesting and compelling. The story being based on truth is quite interesting as well! I loved the atmosphere in the novel, the whole unease surrounding the cult. Dilys as a character was very interesting and I found her to be well-written because her psyche matched her actions. I also liked how the author included some queer aspects into the novel making it much more interesting to me! I really loved the descriptions of Dilys’ feelings for Grace. The Rapture being a book that surrounds around a cult felt very eeire and I was at times scared for Dilys and was anticipating her next actions. The story in itself included many revelations that I liked and gasped at some of them because I was not expecting that. The author addressing Octavia as Her in the book sent shivers down my spine because you could sense that Octavia is someone who’s in charge. The ending of the book left me feeling satisfied which I appreciated although I wouldn’t have predicted it’d end like that because in my mind I had something darker as the ending. There is no particular reason why I’m giving this book four out of five stars but it didn’t feel like a five star read although it was a great and compelling one.

The Rapture is a spine-chilling and fascinating book about a woman living a cult who slowly begins to find out that not everything is what it seems.

I would like to thank the publisher Faber&Faber for providing me with a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by the fact that I got this book from the publisher.

My rating:

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Claire McGlasson is a journalist who works for ITV News Anglia and enjoys the variety of life on the road with a TV camera. Her role gives her access to high-profile interviewees, and takes her behind-the-scenes at places that she’d never ordinarily get to go. But the biggest privilege of her job is spending time with people at the very best, and very worst, times of their lives and helping them to tell their stories. She lives in Cambridgeshire with her favourite people – her husband, daughter and son.

Her first novel, THE RAPTURE, which is based on true events in an Edwardian women’s cult, was published by Faber in Spring 2019. McGlasson’s debut novel about a real-life cult, set in 1920s England, is being turned into a television series after Hillbilly Television optioned the rights.

Find her on: Goodreads and Twitter.

[BLOG TOUR: BOOK EXTRACT] Liberation Square by Gareth Rubin @MichaelJBooks @GarethRubin

I’m excited to share an excerpt from Liberation Square with you as part of my blog tour stop! Hope you like it!

BOOK EXTRACT

Make sure to follow other bloggers on this tour!

Add ‘Liberation Square‘ to your TBR: 

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Gareth Rubin is an author and journalist who has written for most British national newspapers. He lives in London, and Liberation Square is his first novel.

Find him on: Publishers website, Goodreads and Twitter.

[BLOG TOUR: BOOK REVIEW] The Glass Woman by Caroline Lea @MichaelJBooks @CarolineleaLea

I couldn’t resist joining the blog tour for The Glass Woman when I read the synopsis of it. I just felt like it’s my kind of book – it has all the elements I like: historical fiction, mystery and intriguing plot.

The Glass Woman takes place in Iceland in the year 1686 where we meet Rósa, a young woman who lives in poverty with her mother in a small community where life is hard. Rósa becomes spoken for by Jón who’s a powerful figure and who can help Rósa and her mother live a better life. Rósa begins her new life with her husband but something’s not right.. There is talk of Jón’s first wife’s mysterious death and talk of witchcraft. What secrets lie in the village of Stykkishólmur? Will Rósa be able to uncover them?

I love reading historical fiction books a lot so whenever I get the chance to read these I get very excited. The setting of this novel is in Iceland which is very cool because it’s a great setting for a book especially this one. Caroline Lea transported me to the 1686 Iceland and I couldn’t put the book down. The characters in this book are very interesting and getting into their psyche was something I loved because they had many flaws and many desires, wishes etc. At first Jón was an unlikable character and I couldn’t stand him but I love how we saw more of him and my opinion completely changed. I loved Rósa’s commentary because she’s a smart one and I absolutely understood her position and felt sad for her. I read the book in two days because of how compelling it was and that’s what a good book does. I liked the plot but getting deeper into it I wanted more to be realised from the story but the way story went was still entertaining and kept me reading on. I feel like saying anything further will spoil your experience with the book so I won’t say a word.

The Glass Woman is a book I’d definitely recommend to historical fiction lovers because it’s compelling, the setting is fantastic and it will keep you at the edge of your seat.

I would like to thank the publisher Michael Joseph for providing me with a review copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating:

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Caroline Lea was born and raised in Jersey. She gained a First in English Literature and Creative Writing from Warwick University and has had poetry published in The Phoenix Anthology and An Aston Anthology, which she also co-edited. When the Sky Fell Apart is her first novel.
Find her on: Goodreads and Twitter

[BLOG TOUR: BOOK EXTRACT] The Glass Woman by Caroline Lea @MichaelJBooks @CarolineleaLea

BOOK EXTRACT – PROLOGUE

I am delighted to share an excerpt of The Glass Woman by Caroline Lea with you today! I hope you like it – let me know your thoughts below. A review will follow shortly!

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Caroline Lea was born and raised in Jersey. She gained a First in English Literature and Creative Writing from Warwick University and has had poetry published in The Phoenix Anthology and An Aston Anthology, which she also co-edited. When the Sky Fell Apart is her first novel.
Find her on: Goodreads and Twitter

[REVIEW] Little by Edward Carey @BelgraviaB

Until I find a hi res cover of the book this will be up.

Seeing Little all over Twitter made me very curious about it plus the art inside. I was lucky enough to get a copy of it to review and I absolutely adored it.

Little follows Anne Marie Grosholtz later to be known as Madame Tussaud. We follow Marie from the minute she’s born and then into her old age. Marie’s life is full of adventure, pain, loss, happiness, excitement. At a young age [and after the death of her parents] she becomes apprenticed to a wax sculptor called Doctor Curtius who sees potential in her because she’s not the one to shy away from looking at the ugly side of life. By chance they move their residence to an odd house where she meets a widow and her strange son who become entangled into the wax world and leave a mark upon Marie. Doctor Curtius’ wax figures attract attention and one day Marie meets a princess who hires her to be her ‘art teacher’ and teach her everything she knows. She forms a bond with the princess but things slowly change because something’s beginning in Paris – something that will change Marie’s life forever.

Congratulations, you have survived my terrible summary of Little! Moving on – what can one say about this book except that it’s magical, fantastic and brilliantly written? There’s a quote on the back of Little that stayed with me throughout the book and that’s one author saying that the book is written ‘with surgical precision’ which I have to completely agree with. I loved Carey’s writing style and how he managed to bring Marie, Doctor Curtius, Edmond and other characters to life. The book contains drawings made by the author which compliment the story so well. I am in awe of Carey’s talent in both fields – writing and drawing. The story kept me entertained, made me feel sad towards the end and happy because I loved following Marie and her adventures. I can honestly say that Little is a book I won’t forget and that it will stay with me for a while.

If you enjoy reading historical fiction and stories that stay with you long after you finish them – Little is definitely the book for you.

I would like to thank the publisher Belgravia Books (Aardvark Bureau) for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Edward Carey is a writer and illustrator who was born in North Walsham, Norfolk, England, during an April snowstorm. Like his father and his grandfather, both officers in the Royal Navy, he attended Pangbourne Nautical College, where the closest he came to following his family calling was playing Captain Andy in the school’s production of Showboat. Afterwards he joined the National Youth Theatre and studied drama at Hull University.

He has written plays for the National Theatre of Romania and the Vilnius Small State Theatre, Lithuania. In England his plays and adaptations have been performed at the Young Vic Studio, the Battersea Arts Centre, and the Royal Opera House Studio. He has collaborated on a shadow puppet production of Macbeth in Malaysia, and with the Faulty Optic Theatre of Puppets.

He is also the author of the novels Observatory Mansions and Alva and Irva: the Twins Who Saved a City, which have been translated into thirteen different languages, and both of which he illustrated…

Find him on: Website, Twitter and Goodreads.

[REVIEW] The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker @PenguinRHUK

What attracted me to this book was the plot – Trojan War, Achilles! – but most of all the promise of it being told from the point of women and being centered around them. I also have to say that the cover is so beautiful and it just suits the book so well.

‘I was immediately aware of a new desire, to be part of it, to dissolve into it: the sea that feels nothing and can never be hurt.’

The book begins with Briseis, who upon taking shelter as the war rages on in her city decides to check on her mother-in-law because she’s sick. Making sure her mother-in-law got what she needed she returns back to the place where women and children hide and await their doom. When the Greeks enter Lyrnessus, Briseis is standing on the roof of a building of the shelter and what she witnesses is very horrific – Achilles killing her brothers and husband – but if that’s not enough to cause chills down her spine, Achilles looks up and stares at her and then continues his quest in conquering the city. What she feared happens and once fighting’s over the men turn their attention to women and children. Most of the women become imprisoned as slaves to certain kings. Briseis becomes awarded to Achilles who happens to have killed every person she loved. She’s put in this horrifying situation where she has to be brave in order to survive and although she hates Achilles and all the men who destroyed her city – she must not show it. From this point on our story begins and what we as readers witness is the ugliness of war.

The way Pat Barker told this story brought shivers down my spine at times because I felt like I was witnessing the horrors the women in it went through – from being raped to preparing men’s bodies for cremation. Barker is a fantastic writer and her skills to make you feel like you were there are something to admire. Briseis was such a fascinating character and I loved her strength. Barker showed that it’s not just the men who fight in the war that have strength but the women whose roles are so important. The ‘godlike’ Achilles was wonderfully written as well as Patroclus who I loved throughout the novel as well as the portrayal of their ‘friendship’. What I found annoying was the use of certain words that made me cringe e.g. ‘mate’ because they didn’t fit this story. I mean it is a retelling of an important event in Greek mythology so that’s why I found it cringey. I loved how women were portrayed in this novel because of their strength but not so much when it came to the raping and using of the women – the author including the brutality of it made the story richer in a way because that’s how women were treated. I liked that the author didn’t shy away from gory scenes and described certain scenes in detail. The Silence of the Girls came at a perfect time in my life because I spent many hours lost in it.

The Silence of the Girls is a fascinating look into the Trojan War from the perspective of a queen turned Achilles’ slave, Briseis. Inside this book you’ll find the brutality of war and pain women had to endure in order to secure their survival. More often in these tales women are cast aside but their roles are much greater whenever a war rages.

I would like to thank the publisher Penguin Random House UK (Hamish Hamilton) for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Pat Barker was born in Yorkshire and began her literary career in her forties, when she took a short writing course taught by Angela Carter. Encouraged by Carter to continue writing and exploring the lives of working class women, she sent her fiction out to publishers. Thirty-five years later, she has published fifteen novels, including her masterful Regeneration Trilogy, been made a CBE for services to literature, and won awards including the Guardian Fiction Prize and the UK’s highest literary honour, the Booker Prize. She lives in Durham and her new novel, The Silence of the Girls, will be published by Hamish Hamilton in August 2018.

Find her on: Goodreads

[REVIEW] The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton @MantleBooks

If you haven’t heard of Kate Morton then what you need to do is: Open a new tab in your browser -> type in: goodreads.com -> in the search box type: Kate Morton -> voilla you can now investigate every book of hers and see which one you like the best and pick it up ASAP. I’m sure most people have heard of Kate Morton but this is written to save a life in case someone hasn’t. You can imagine my delight when I got an early copy of The Clockmaker’s Daughter, the newest book from Kate Morton.

‘They remain, as they age, the people that they were when they were young, only frailer and sadder.’

The Clockmaker’s Daughter has a great synopsis on its Goodreads page so I am going to copy it here:

‘In the summer of 1862, a group of young artists led by the passionate and talented Edward Radcliffe descends upon Birchwood Manor in rural Oxfordshire. Their plan: to spend a secluded summer month in a haze of inspiration and creativity. But by the time their stay is over, one woman has been shot dead while another has disappeared; a priceless heirloom is missing; and Edward Radcliffe’s life is in ruins.

Over one hundred and fifty years later, Elodie Winslow, a young archivist in London, uncovers a leather satchel containing two seemingly unrelated items: a sepia photograph of an arresting-looking woman in Victorian clothing, and an artist’s sketchbook containing the drawing of a twin-gabled house on the bend of a river.

Why does Birchwood Manor feel so familiar to Elodie? And who is the beautiful woman in the photograph? Will she ever give up her secrets?’

I honestly couldn’t write a better synopsis because I would spoil the book and reveal too much – with reading only the synopsis above I believe that the reader will get enough information before they dive into The Clockmaker’s Daughter.

‘All human beings crave connection, even the introverts, it is too frightening for them to think themselves alone.’

Kate Morton is someone whose books are an excellent escape into a world filled with mystery and wonderful settings. I loved reading about the Birchwood Manor and Morton has managed to capture this place in a magical way which made you picture it vividly. The story is told from multiple perspectives – we have Elodie, Birdie, Juliet, Tip, Lucy etc. – which give the reader a complete picture on all happenings in the book. The writing is what you can expect – lyrical, gorgeous – from Kate Morton. I have noticed that Morton is a great psychologist when it comes to human nature as well as perception. The way Morton writes makes you want to read more and get lost in the world her imagination has created.  The characters in this novel were wonderfully crafted and I especially liked Lucy and well as Lily (Birdie). Although I’ve enjoyed this book it a lot, this isn’t her best one – you still feel that satisfaction of going back into her world and getting lost in it but the story, for me, didn’t have a ‘wow’ factor. I have expected more of the magic that she puts in it but sadly I didn’t feel it with The Clockmaker’s Daughter. The first one-hundred pages were very slow and I couldn’t wait to get past them because I knew it would pick up. I believe that other Kate Morton fans will relate with me about these issues but who knows I might be the only one.. If anyone is on the edge about reading this book just know that after I read half of the book I couldn’t put it down and read more than three-hundred pages in a day.

‘..And so she avoided love. That is, she avoided the complication of locking hearts with another human being.’

The Clockmaker’s Daughter is nothing short of a great summer read which will transport you to a beautiful world of mystery, art, love and into the amazing place called Birchwood Manor.

The Clockmaker’s Daughter will be out on September 20th 2018 published by Mantle.

I would like to thank the publisher Mantle Books for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions written here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Kate Morton was born in South Australia, grew up in the mountains of south-east Queensland and now lives with her family in London and Australia. She has degrees in dramatic art and English literature, and harboured dreams of joining the Royal Shakespeare Company until she realised that it was words she loved more than performing. Kate still feels a pang of longing each time she goes to the theatre and the house lights dim…

Find her on: WebsiteInstagram, Facebook and GoodReads.

[REVIEW] The Lion Tamer Who Lost by Louise Beech @OrendaBooks

I have seen this book on Twitter and saw that it’s LGBTQ+ so I immediately had to get a copy of it and read it! I found the synopsis of the book to sound very interesting because of different settings the story takes place in.

The Lion Tamer Who Lost is a book about two people, Ben and Andrew, who seem to meet each other in unusual circumstances and quite often. From the moment Ben sets eyes of Andrew [in a library] he falls for him and something gives him courage to leave his number in a book Andrew was reading. Fast forward to some more coincidence-meetings and they start a relationship with each other. They spent much of their time together, hanging out at Ben’s place, going to the circus etc. Ben’s father is a peculiar being who drinks a lot, Ben is afraid that his father wouldn’t accept his sexuality so he keeps it quiet. During their relationship Ben and Andrew learn a lot about each other, Ben shares that he always wanted to travel to Africa and take care of lions while Andrew shows Ben a wish box he believes is magical. Ben goes to Africa, but why has he gone? What happened between Ben and Andrew?

I love that this book is LGBTQ+ because I feel like it would’ve been boring if it wasn’t. I found The Lion Tamer Who Lost to be an interesting read filled with heart and great writing but I did have some issues with it. My issues with it are based on my tastes (of course) and some may disagree with me but this bothered me: I found the book to be predictable at times and felt that there were cliches in it. I have to keep this review spoiler free so I can’t get into exactly what bothered me but I can say that the tragedy in the book was something I found to be okay for this story [meaning it compels you to read on] even though I didn’t find it necessary. Ben and Andrew’s love story is something I loved reading about and the author made them come to life with her writing. The chapters alternate between past and present and we have a number of parts which are titled BEN and ANDREW. Out of both main characters in this book I found Andrew to be most likable and so sweet. I loved Andrew and enjoyed reading his parts the most. Aside from my issues with it I believe that many people will enjoy picking this book up and I salute Louise for writing an LGBTQ+ book because we need more of them in the world.

The Lion Tamer Who Lost is a love story between Ben and Andrew that  begins as a series of meet-cutes which eventually forms into a love story that grabs you and doesn’t let go until the very end.

I would like to thank the publisher Orenda Books for sending a copy of this book my way in exchange for an honest review. All opinions mentioned here are my own and weren’t influenced by anything.

My rating: 

Add ‘The Lion Tamer Who Lost‘ to your TBR:  

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Louise Beech knew from being small that she wanted to write, to create, to make magic. She regularly writes travel pieces for the Hull Daily Mail, where she was a columnist for ten years. Her short fiction has won the Glass Woman Prize, the Eric Hoffer Award for Prose, and the Aesthetica Creative Works competition, as well as shortlisting for the Bridport Prize twice and being published in a variety of UK magazines. Her debut novel was a Guardian Readers’ Pick for 2015. Louise lives with her husband and children on the outskirts of Hull – the UK’s 2017 City of Culture – and loves her job as a Front of House Usher at Hull Truck Theatre, where her first play was performed in 2012. She was also part of the Mums’ Army on Lizzie and Carl’s BBC Radio Humberside Breakfast Show for three years.

Find her on: Website, Twitter and GoodReads.

[REVIEW] The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne

This book has been everywhere since September/November time: on Goodreads, on Instagram, Twitter etc. I read a few raving reviews and have wanted to read it ever since and when I got the chance I was so excited! I am so glad I had the chance to read it because this book is something very special.

The Heart’s Invisible Furies follows Cyril Avery from the age of seven and decade by decade into his seventies. Cyril Avery is someone who has been left as a child in care of two very peculiar people, Charles and Maude Avery. His adoptive parents’ peculiarity is pretty extreme because from an early age Cyril learns a lot by looking at them and observing their behaviour. One of the things his adoptive father always says to him is: ‘You’re not a real Avery’ which is a sentence he will remember all his life.  Since we follow Cyril decade by decade what happens next is that we follow him as he goes on to college and becomes acquainted with a boy named Julian. They become very good friends and their friendship is something that we learn a lot about throughout the book. This will be all I’m going to say about the synopsis of this book.

‘I sometimes feel as if I wasn’t supposed to live among people at all. As if I would be happier on a little island somewhere, all alone with my books and some writing material for company. I could grow my own food and never have to speak to a soul..’

“I was deluding myself, for love was one thing but desire was something else entirely.”

“It’s as if she understood completely the condition of loneliness and how it undermines us all, forcing us to make choices that we know are wrong for us.”

“I’ve always believed that if women could only collectively harness the power that they have then they’d rule the world.”

The Heart’s Invisible Furies is a book that leaves a mark on you – its story makes you turn the pages and dive into Cyril Avery’s life filled with moments of happiness and moments of great sadness. I loved the humour in this book and the line which has stayed with me is the ‘Cyril II’ because every time Cyril II was mentioned I cracked up. I laughed out loud reading this book and felt very sad and angry reading it. Boyne touches on many topics such as homosexuality in Ireland, the view of the church which was very assertive at that time, the AIDS crisis and much more. After I finished the book I quickly found the pages where Boyne talked about the inspiration behind this book and why he wrote it which I really enjoyed reading because it gave a new dimension into the story. This book has been pretty hyped up but it doesn’t fail like most hyped-up books tend to do – it is truly brilliant. I love following stories that span through decades like A Little Life so I knew that I would enjoy this one as well. I just found a small tiny thing annoying in the book and that was seven-year-olds talking about sex because it didn’t feel realistic [I might be wrong] but other than that I have no complaints. Once again, a wonderfully told story about a gay man and his struggles with finding himself.

You can obviously see by my review and rating that this is a book you should be picking up and reading ASAP.

I would like to thank the publisher Transworld Books (Black Swan) for sending a copy of this book my way in exchange for an honest review. I am forever grateful.

My rating: 

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

John Boyne (born 30 April 1971 in Dublin) is an Irish novelist. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, where he won the Curtis Brown prize. In 2015, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters by UEA. John Boyne is the author of ten novels for adults and five for young readers, as well as a collection of short stories.
His novels are published in over 50 languages. The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, which to date has sold more than 7 million copies worldwide, is a #1 New York Times Bestseller and a film adaptation was released in September 2008

Find him on: WebsiteGoodReads, Twitter.

 

[REVIEW] Dark Matter by Michelle Paver

Before I start this review I want to give a little update since probably many of you have noticed I’m not as active with posting reviews. I started university in October so since then life has been very busy which meant little time for reading but now I’m trying to get back to blogging and reading because I’m very far behind my review copies and am very excited to read them. From now on I won’t be posting weekly but when I get the time to review. Note to publishers: No fear, I will definitely fulfill all my obligations to you and review all the books that were sent to me. Onto the review:

I always find describing synopses of books hard because I feel I’m not good at it but like always I’ll do my best to write a spoiler-free synopsis. The book begins in 1935 London with Jack Miller, who’s a scholar who hasn’t really found excitement in life. His day-to-day life has become pretty lonely and boring but one day he’s offered a chance to join an Arctic expedition which would really give him a thrill so he decides to join the rest of the men who are going. The men who are going are wealthier – we see this in the first twenty pages, how he fears that he won’t have enough money to pay for everyone’s drinks – than him and being in a lower position than the other men makes him kind of uncomfortable but that quickly changes as they head on to Gruhuken. In the first plan there were supposed to be five men who went accompanied alongside eight huskies. Two men were faced with certain difficulties before heading to their destination so there are three left – Jack, Gus and Algie. Their plan is to stay for a few months on the expedition and investigate the land. Gus becomes sick and is in need of surgery so he has to leave Gruhuken and Algie accompanies him because of the potential negative outcome of the operation. Our main voice Jack is left alone in the structure they built. Jack has noticed something dark creeping up on the strange place called Gruhuken. Is it possible his mind is playing tricks on him? Could it be possible that the others have seen what he has seen?

I haven’t read a scary book in a long while so this was quite an interesting read. This book is told in the form of  Jack’s journal entries and we are introduced to the daily routines and life in Gruhuken. The thing I liked about this book is that it’s a really fast and engaging read. It keeps you intrigued and never seems to tire you because you become very invested in finding out what’s happening in Gruhuken. Our main character Jack Miller is a great character and I love how we got to see his psyche change as the novel went on. The character of Gus was my favourite in the book because of who he was – a very lovable kind of guy. I admire Jack’s decision to stay on the expedition even though he’s seen certain things which would scare most people away and that shows his determination and will to not let anyone down. My critique would be that I wish we got to see more of an insight into Jack’s mind even though there were many insights I just wish they were written more in depth. I also wanted a better resolution to the story because Paver WHY!? I wish we would’ve gotten more answers to certain questions but it was overall a very entertaining read. I have to compliment her skills at making you scared at times because some scenes were really scary (especially while reading at night).

Dark Matter is a book any lover of ghost stories will definitely enjoy and also there are topics to analyse in it which make it even more interesting and worth reading.

My rating: 

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**I am in no way compensated by these sites. I am simply sharing it so people can find this book easier.

Michelle Paver was born in Central Africa, but came to England as a child. After gaining a degree in Biochemistry from Oxford University, she became a partner in a City law firm, but eventually gave that up to write full-time.

The hugely successful Chronicles of Ancient Darkness series arose from Michelle’s lifelong passion for animals, anthropology and the distant past – as as well as an encounter with a large bear in a remote valley in southern California. To research the books, Michelle has traveled to Finland, Greenland, Sweden, Norway, Arctic Canada and the Carpathian Mountains. She has slept on reindeer skins, swum with wild orca (killer whales), and got nose-to-nose with polar bears – and, of course, wolves.

Find her on: WebsiteGoodreadsTwitter and Facebook.